Recent Work

Chris Cornell

This may be a little self-indulgent, but I'm sad and don't really care.

I first saw Soundgarden in Newcastle in January 1997. If I'm honest, that wasn't a great show - it was just a couple of months before they broke up, and in hindsight, you could tell they just weren't into it.

Fast forward to 2012, and I was a music photographer, shooting my first Big Day Out. Soundgarden were back together and on the lineup. Here are some photos I took of Chris Cornell.

RIP.

Hobart Dawn

I recently spent a weekend in Hobart. I didn't take many photographs because, well, it wasn't that kind of trip.

I did get up early one morning and drove to the summit of Mount Wellington, where it was 2.7 degrees, with crazy winds making it feel like -8.2 degrees. The drive back down was much more pleasant, so I stopped when I saw this golden dawn light falling on the foothills and Lenah Valley.

Coolum

Hi. Remember me? It's been a while, and a lot has happened since I last posted.

For one, I've gone back to a job in my other profession - environmental consulting - which means I'm back to being an "amateur" photographer. Whatever that means. 

But what it has meant, from a practical perspective, is that I haven't picked up a camera for a few weeks. Until this weekend, when I spent a couple of days at Coolum on the Sunshine Coast. Swimming in the ocean. Eating takeaway. Taking the dogs to the beach. Making photographs. Does it get much better?

Sleeklens Lightroom Workflow

I've been meaning to get out and shoot some landscapes for the last couple of weeks, after the folks at Sleeklens sent me a copy of their "Through The Woods" Lightroom Workflow for Landscapes. I finally managed to get out the door early this morning and head out to Oxley Creek Common, an area of grazing land not far from home.

Turns out it's not a great spot for my usual wide-open landscapes, with power lines and warehouses running through the background, so I focused first on this fence running away into the early morning fog.

Here's the straight-out-of-camera photograph. A little dull, huh?

And below is the final product after running through the Sleeklens workflow. Remember that word "workflow". More on that later.

And of course, although it's called a Landscape Workflow, the presets can be used on non-landscape photos too. I came across this kookaburra sitting on a low branch, no doubt waiting for some prey to stir. Again, the straight-out-of-camera versions of each shot is first, followed by the finished product.

I've tried a lot of Lightroom Presets, most of which are a blunt instrument - one click results in broad scale changes which, if you're lazy, give you a final product. Or, of course, you can use them as a starting point for further refinement.

The Sleeklens presets work differently. Sure there are some "All In One" traditional-style presets, but the real power comes from the stackable workflow, which allows you to select a base tone, then make some exposure adjustments, colour corrections, tone and tint adjustments and final polishes.

But it doesn't end there. Sleeklens also includes thirty local adjustment brush presets, which let you go in and make adjustments and corrections to specific parts of the image. The end result is a much more customisable use of presets and adjustment brushes than the one-click "instagram filter" approach of many other presets.

If you'd like to try the Through The Woods workflow yourself, it can be purchased for $39 USD from Sleeklens.